X86 Opcode and Instruction Reference

MazeGen, 2009-01-20 Revision: 1.11

This reference is intended to be precise opcode and instruction set reference (including x86-64). Its principal aim is exact definition of instruction parameters and attributes.

Quick Navigation

coder32, coder32-abc, geek32, geek32-abc

coder64, coder64-abc, geek64, geek64-abc

coder, coder-abc, geek, geek-abc (these contain both x86-32 and x64 instructions).

In contrast to other references, primary source of this reference is an XML document, which guarantees clear and structured information base and therefore ability to extract many various informations such as a list of instructions from requested groups, etc.

The reference is primarily based on Intel manuals as Intel is the originator of x86 architecture. Additionally, it describes undocumented instructions as well. On appropriate places, it gives a notice if an opcode act differently on AMD architecture. Support for Cyrix, NexGen etc. specific instructions is not scheduled at all.

Store

Get one copy for $20, two copies for $32.

Immediately following the initial release of the reference, it emerged that a large number of users are interested in a printed version. You can order a copy in the on-line store.

HTML Editions

These editions are available at the moment: The coder suite is intended to more common use and contains the following editions: coder32, coder64, and coder (sorted by opcode), and coder32-abc, coder64-abc, and coder-abc (sorted by mnemonic). The geek suite is intended for deeper research of x86 architectures' instruction set. This includes geek32, geek64, and geek editions (by opcode) and geek32-abc, geek64-abc, and geek-abc editions (by mnemonic). More on the purpose and use of this suite see close below.

Don't get confused by geek(-abc) and coder(-abc) editions. Both of them contains instruction set of both x86-32 and x86-64 architectures. If you don't have a particular reason to use them (such as to view the differencies between the architectures), the other editions would probably suit you better.

Editions coder32 a geek32 relate exclusively to x86-32 architecture. Similarly, editions coder64 and geek64 relate exclusively to x86-64 architecture.

The following chart illustrates the differencies between editions for current release:

Edition coder coder32 coder64 geek geek32 geek64
Supported Architectures both pure x86-32 pure x86-64 both pure x86-32 pure x86-64
Operand Codes traditional traditional traditional special special special
Abandoned Instructions no no no yes yes yes
Opcode Bitfields Information no no no yes yes yes
Instruction Extension Indicated yes yes yes yes yes yes
Instruction Group Indicated no no no yes yes yes
Present Instructions general yes yes yes yes yes yes
system yes yes yes yes yes yes
x87FPU yes yes yes yes yes yes
MMX yes yes yes yes yes yes
Intel SSE (all) yes yes yes yes yes yes
VMX yes yes yes yes yes yes
SMX yes yes yes yes yes yes
Itanium no no no yes yes yes

The Purpose of Geek Editions in Short

The geek editions contains as much complete information from the source XML document as possible. That's why they may seem quite unclear. You appreciate them only if you need to get to know the instruction set deeply or if you investigate the source XML and you need to visualize it better.

These editions use specific operand codes (which are described in Instruction Operand Codes chapter below). These codes may look strange and obscure at the first sight. The reason to use them is that they hold more information than the more common ones. One example can be operand combination rAX,imm16/32, such as in instruction ADDrAX,imm16/32 in coder64 edition. One can determine that the destination operand is either ax, eax, or rax, and the source one is either imm16 or imm32. A problem arises when one needs to determine what magic is behind rax,imm32 combination. If one is just getting started with x64 architecture, it is not clear how exactly is 32-bit immediate added to 64-bit rax. This question is answered by corresponding geek edition, ADDrAX,Ivds in geek64 edition. The immediate value is encoded there using Ivds code. I code means Immediate, v means word or doubleword (imm16 or imm32). The most important part is ds code, which means doubleword, sign-extended to 64 bits for 64-bit operand size. Now is it clear.

As for Itanium-specific instructions, they are added just for the sake of interest - they give a notice that the appropriate opcodes are already used.

Hypertext Reference to Particular Opcode

If you want to refer to particular opcode (in any edition), e.g., 0FA0PUSHFS, it can be easily achieved this way:

ref.x86asm.net/geek.html#x0FA0 (try it)

It works for opcode extension similarly, e.g., 83/7CMP:

ref.x86asm.net/coder32.html#x83_7 (try it)

Browsers, Printing

For browsing, the best seem to me Firefox. Opera9 seems to be a bit slower. InternetExplorer6 and7 doesn't support some CSS features so the reference looks slightly different.

Full support for printing is available only as a part of the benefits.

You can also order a printed copy in the on-line store. This is how a copy looks like:

printed_reference_inside.jpg

Using HTML Editions

Since HTML editions can look complicated at first sight, here goes an outline how to work with them. Following examples come from coder32's edition because it is easier to use than geek's editions.

Example: ADC Instruction

Let's start with more known instruction, such as ADC. We find something similar to the following:

|pf|0F|po|so|flds|o|proc|st|m|rl|l|mnemonic|op1     |op2   |op3|op4|iext|grp1|grp2 |tested f|modif f |def f   |undef f|f values|description, notes|
|  |  |11|  |    |r|    |  | |  |L|ADC     |r/m16/32|r16/32|   |   |    |gen |arith|.......c|o..szapc|o..szapc|       |        |Add with Carry    |

First column pf (Prefix) is empty. That means the instruction's opcode doesn't contain any fixed prefix.

Next column 0F is just allocated for 0F prefix for multiple-byte opcodes so it is empty.

Next column po (Primary Opcode) holds primary opcode value itself.

Because the instruction's opcode doesn't contain any added byte, the column so (Secondary Opcode) is empty too.

The opcode doesn't contain any specific bits so the column flds (Opcode Fields) is empty.

The column o (Register/Opcode Field) here holds "r", which indicates that the instruction uses "full" ModR/M byte (no opcode extension).

Because this instruction is supported since 8086 processor, proc column (Introduced with Processor) is empty.

This instruction is officially documented so st column is empty too.

Instruction ADC can work on any ring level so the column rl, Ring Level, is empty.

The column x holds "L", which means that LOCK prefix is allowed with this instruction.

Next three columns, mnemonic, op1 and op2 show instruction's syntax. The destination operand of this instruction is set up using bold, what always means the operand is modified by the instruction.

The column iext (Instruction Extension Group) is empty because the instruction doesn't belong to any instruction set extension.

Columns grp1 andgrp2 classify the instruction among general arithmetic instructions.

ADC instruction is influenced by CF flag, what represents testedf column.

This instruction influences (overwrites) all status flags. These can be found in next column modiff column.

All of these flags are defined (don't contain random values) so the same flags are in next deff column, and undeff column must be empty.

No flag is set to a fixed value (all modified flags depend on input operands) so fvalues column is empty.

Last column description, notes contains only a general description of the instruction.

Example: Opcode Extensions

Some opcodes (only a few) depend on Opcode Extension Field in ModR/M byte. Using this field, the opcode is actually extended by three bits. In most cases, different extension of the same opcode means more or less different instruction. An example can be opcode F6. We choose last three extensions of the opcode:

|pf|0F|po|so|flds|o|proc|st|m|rl|l|mnemonic|op1|op2|op3 |op4 |iext|grp1|grp2 |tested f|modif f |def f   |undef f |f values|description, notes|
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|  |  |F6|  |    |5|    |  | |  | |IMUL    |AX |AL |r/m8|    |    |gen |arith|        |o..szapc|o......c|...szap.|        |Signed Multiply   |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|  |  |F6|  |    |6|    |  | |  | |DIV     |AL |AH |AX  |r/m8|    |gen |arith|        |o..szapc|        |o..szapc|        |Unsigned Divide   |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|  |  |F6|  |    |7|    |  | |  | |IDIV    |AL |AH |AX  |r/m8|    |gen |arith|        |o..szapc|        |o..szapc|        |Signed Divide     |

The opcode extension can be a value from0 through7. These values are indicated in o (Register/Opcode Field) column. In this example, values5,6, and7 are chosen.

Additionally, this example shows that operands, which are not explicitly used (AL, AH, and AX operands), are set up using italic. It also shows that DIV and IDIV instructions always destroy all status flags: both modiff and undeff column contain these flags.

Example: One Opcode, More Syntaxes

Some opcodes are represented by more instructions with the same meaning, using different syntaxes. (This doesn't apply to the case when an opcode depends on Opcode Extension field in ModR/M byte. In this case, these instructions act more or less differently). Best known example are conditional jumps, for example JZ/JE, where we find something similar:

|pf|0F|po|so|flds|o|proc|st|m|rl|l|mnemonic|op1     |op2|op3|op4|iext|grp1|grp2  |tested f|modif f|def f|undef f|f values|description, notes             |
|  |  |74|  |    | |    |  | |  | |JZ      |rel8    |   |   |   |    |gen |branch|....z...|       |     |       |        |Jump short if zero/equal (ZF=0)|
|  |  |  |  |    | |    |  | |  | |JE      |rel8    |   |   |   |    |    |      |        |       |     |       |        |                               |

Each syntax has dedicated row in mnemonic column and in columns with instruction operands.

More complex case is, for example, MOVS/MOVSW/MOVSD instruction:

|pf|0F|po|so|flds|o|proc|st|m|rl|l|mnemonic|op1   |op2   |op3|op4|iext|grp1|grp2   |tested f|modif f|def f|undef f|f values|description, notes             |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|  |  |A5|  |    | |    |  | |  | |MOVS    |m16   |m16   |   |   |    |gen |datamov|.d......|       |     |       |        |Move Data from String to String|
|  |  |  |  |    | |    |  | |  | |MOVSW   |m16   |m16   |   |   |    |    |string |        |       |     |       |        |                               |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|  |  |A5|  |    | |03+ |  | |  | |MOVS    |m16/32|m16/32|   |   |    |gen |datamov|.d......|       |     |       |        |Move Data from String to String|
|  |  |  |  |    | |    |  | |  | |MOVSD   |m32   |m32   |   |   |    |    |string |        |       |     |       |        |                               |

Here, the opcode's record is complicated by the fact that since 80386 processor, the syntax is extended (thanks to 32-bit operands) with MOVSD mnemonic and MOVS syntax is changed. That's why all four syntaxes have to be split by twos.

More examples with multiple syntaxes: PUSHA/PUSHAD, SHL/SAL, or SLDT.

Example: Undocumented Instruction SETALC

All main editions contain a few undocumented instructions (from the Intel manual point of view). No that in this reference, undocumented doesn't equal invalid. All undocumented instructions mentioned by this reference work well in their shape. It is, for example, SETALC instruction:

|pf|0F|po|so|flds|o|proc|st|m|rl|l|mnemonic|op1|op2|op3|op4|iext|grp1|grp2   |tested f|modif f |def f|undef f|f values|description, notes                           |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|  |  |D6|  |    | |02+ |D5| |  | |undefined               |    |    |       |        |        |     |       |        |Undefined and Reserved; Does not Generate #UD|
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|  |  |D6|  |    | |02+ |U6| |  | |SALC    |AL |   |   |   |    |gen |datamov|.......c|        |     |       |        |Set AL If Carry                              |
|  |  |  |  |    | |    |  | |  | |SETALC  |AL |   |   |   |    |    |       |        |        |     |       |        |                                             |

In this case, the documented meaning goes first, as indicated in st column by "D" value. Since this opcode's documented meaning is not a common one, there is additional reference to the description where the opcode is documented. The column mnemonic implies by the value "undefined" (which is set up using italic, which always means here that it is not an original mnemonic) that the documented meaning of this opcode is "undefined and reserved". This is also stated in the last column.

Below goes the undocumented meaning of the opcode - st column holds "U" value. Each undocumented meaning should contain a reference to the description where is the opcode unofficially documented, like in this case.

More examples of undocumented instructions: INT1/ICEBP or TEST.

Columns Description

Quick navigation:

Name Meaning Description, Examples
pf Prefix Fixed extraordinary prefix, which may change the semantic of the Primary Opcode. Usually used in case of waiting x87FPU instructions, and many SSE instructions. F390PAUSE, 9BD9/7FSTCW, F30F10MOVSS
0F 0FPrefix Dedicated for 0FPrefix. two-byte opcodes
po Primary Opcode Basic opcode. Second opcode byte in case of two- and three-byte opcodes. For coder's editions: +r means a register code, from 0through7, added to the value. 50PUSH
so Secondary Opcode Fixed appended value to the primary opcode. It is used in some special cases, x87FPU instructions and for new three-byte instructions. D40AAAM, D50AAAD, D5F8FLD1, three-byte escape 0F38
flds Opcode Fields This column is present only in geek's editions. It contain present Primary Opcode binary fields. These are:
  • +r means a register code, from 0through7, added to the basic value of the Primary Opcode. 40INC
The following fields are case-sensitive: if a letter of the code is set up in lower case, it means the appropriate bit is cleared, otherwise is set.
  • w means bit w (bit index0, operand size) is present; may be combined with bits d ors. 04ADD
  • s means bits (bit index1, Sign-extend) is present; may be combined with bitw. 6BIMUL
  • d means bit d (bit index1, Direction) is present; may be combined with bitw. 00ADD
  • tttn means bit field tttn (4 bits, bit index0, condition). Used only with conditional instructions. 70JO
  • sr means segment register specifier - acode of one of original four segment registers (2 bits, bit index3). See also S2 addressing method. 06PUSH
  • sre means segment register specifier - acode of any segment registers (3 bits, bit index0 or3). See also S30 and S33 addressing methods. 0FA0PUSH
  • mf means bit field MF (2 bits, bit index1, memory format); used only with x87FPU instructions coded with second floating-point instruction format. DA/0FIADD
o Register/ Opcode Field
  1. The value of the opcode extension (values from0 through7). group80
  2. r indicates that the ModR/M byte contains a register operand and an r/m operand. 00ADD
proc Introduced with Processor Indicates the instruction's introductory processor (code in curves apply to XML reference):
  • 00: 8086
  • 01: 80186
  • 02: 80286
  • 03: 80386
  • 04: 80486
  • P1 (05): Pentium(1)
  • PX (06): Pentium withMMX
  • PP (07): PentiumPro
  • P2 (08): PentiumII
  • P3 (09): PentiumIII
  • P4 (10): Pentium4
  • C1 (11): Core(1)
  • C2 (12): Core2
  • C7 (13): Corei7
  • IT (99): Itanium (only geek editions)
The opcodes that are not forward-compatible (the ones which have been abandoned) are present only in geek's editions.
  1. If the processor marking is a range (e.g., 03-04), it means that the instruction is unsupported in latter processors. 0F24MOV
  2. + (e.g., 00+) means the instruction is supported in any of latter processors and also in 64-bit mode, if the next row doesn't explicitly say otherwise. 06PUSHES
  3. ++ (e.g., P4++) the same meaning, but only in the latter steppings of the processor (e.g., SSE3 instruction extensions). 0FA2CPUID
If this column is empty: In case of 32-bit editions, it means 00+ (8086 and all latter processors). In case of 64-bit editions, it means P4++ (P4, latter stepping, and all latter processors), because Intel64 Architecture is available since latter stepping of the Pentium4 processor.
st Document. Status Indicates how is the instruction documented in the Intel manuals:
  1. D means fully documented. It can contain a reference to description which chapter in Intel manual it is documented in, if it may be unclear. D6
  2. M means documented only marginally. 66(SSE2)
  3. U undocumented at all. It should contain a reference to description of the source. Note that in this reference, undocumented doesn't equal invalid. All mentioned undocumented instructions should work well in their scope. D6SALC
If this column is empty, it means D (documented with no further notes).
m Mode of Operation Indicates the mode, which is the instruction validon. Virtual-8086 Mode is not taken into account.
  1. R applies for real, protected and 64-bit mode. SMM is not taken into account.
  2. P applies for protected and 64-bit mode. SMM is not taken into account. group0F00
  3. E applies for 64-bit mode. SMM is not taken into account. 63MOVSXD
  4. S applies for SMM. 0FAARSM
If this column is empty, it means R. For 64-bit editions, Ecode indicates in most cases that the semantics of the opcode is specific to 64-bit mode.
rl Ring Level The ring level, which is the instruction valid (3 or0) from; findicates that the level depends on a flag(s) and it should contain a reference to the description of that flag, if the flag is not too complex. If this column is empty, it means ring3. INT, INS, RDTSC
x Lock Prefix L indicates that the instruction is basically valid with F0LOCK prefix. 00ADD
FPUPush/ FPUPop The following codes apply only to x87 FPU instructions (none of them can use LOCK prefix).
  • s incidates that the opcode performs additional push of a value to the register stack. D9/0FLD
  • p incidates that the opcode performs additional pop of the register stack. D9/3FSTP
  • P incidates the same like p, but pops twice. DA/5FUCOMPP
mnemonic Instr. Mnemonic The instruction mnemonic itself. If there is no mnemonic, it holds additional information about the mnemonic or instruction:
  • If the mnemonic is set up using italic, there is no oficial mnemonic and the present one is just suggested one. D4AMX, D5ADX, 0FB9UD
  • nomnemonic means that there is no mnemonic for the opcode. 66
  • invalid means that the opcode is invalid. This option is not used everywhere the opcode is invalid, but only in some cases. 06(64-bit mode)
  • undefined means that the behaviour of the instruction is according to official documentation undefined. D6
  • nop means that the opcode is treated as integer NOP instruction. It should contain a reference to description of the source. nomnenonicnop
  • null means that the prefix has no meaning (no operation). 26(64-bit mode)
If there is a mnemonic, it can hold additional attributes of the instruction:
  • nop means that the instruction is treated as integer NOP instruction (except NOP instructions themselves). It should contain a reference to description of the source. DBE0FNENI
Only geek's editions:
  • alias means that the opcode is an alias to another opcode. The attribute should be a reference to that instruction. group 82, C0/6SAL
  • part alias means not true alias. It should contain a reference to the description of the differences between referenced instructions. F1INT1
op1, op2, ... Instr. Operands Instruction operands. Geek's editions use special operand codes, explained in Instruction Operand Codes chapter below. If an operand is set up using italic, it is an implicit operand, which is not explicitly used. If an operand is set up using boldface, it is modified by the instruction.
iext Instr. Extension Group The instruction extension group, which was the opcode released on:
  1. MMX MMX Technology
  2. SSE1 Streaming SIMD Extensions(1)
  3. SSE2 Streaming SIMD Extensions2
  4. SSE3 Streaming SIMD Extensions3
  5. SSSE3 Supplemental Streaming SIMD Extensions3
  6. SSE41 Streaming SIMD Extensions4.1
  7. SSE42 Streaming SIMD Extensions4.2
  8. VMX Virtualization Technology Extensions
  9. SMX Safer Mode Extensions
grp1, grp2, grp3 Main Group, Sub-group, Sub -sub-group These columns are present only in geek's editions. They classifies the instruction among groups. These groups don't match the instruction groups given by the Intel manual (I found them too loose). One instruction may fit into more groups.
  1. prefix
    1. segreg segment register
    2. branch
      1. cond conditional
    3. x87fpu
      1. control (only WAIT)
  2. obsol obsolete
    1. control
  3. gen general
    1. datamov data movement
    2. stack
    3. conver type conversion
    4. arith arithmetic
      1. binary
      2. decimal
    5. logical
    6. shftrot shift&rotate
    7. bit bit manipulation
    8. branch
      1. cond conditional
    9. break interrupt
    10. string (means that the instruction can make use of the REP family prefixes)
    11. inout I/O
    12. flgctrl flag control
    13. segreg segment register manipulation
    14. control
  4. system
    1. branch
      1. trans transitional (implies sensitivity to operand-size attribute)
  5. x87fpu x87FPU
    1. datamov data movement
    2. arith basic arithmetic
    3. compar comparison
    4. trans transcendental
    5. ldconst load constant
    6. control
    7. conv conversion
  6. sm x87FPU and SIMD state management
MMX instruction extensions technology groups. Note that these groups are just experimental and may change in future.
  1. datamov data movement
  2. arith packed arithmetic
  3. compar comparison
  4. conver conversion
  5. logical
  6. shift
  7. unpack unpacking
SSE1 instruction extensions groups. Note that these groups are just experimental and may change in future.
  1. simdfp SIMD single-precision floating-point
    1. datamov data movement
    2. arith packed arithmetic
    3. compar comparison
    4. logical
    5. shunpck shuffle&unpacking
  2. conver conversion instructions
  3. simdint 64-bit SIMD integer
  4. mxcsrsm MXCSR state management
  5. cachect cacheability control
  6. fetch prefetch
  7. order instruction ordering
SSE2 instruction extensions groups. Note that these groups are just experimental and may change in future.
  1. pcksclr packed and scalar double-precision floating-point
    1. datamov data movement
    2. conver conversion
    3. arith packed arithmetic
    4. compar comparison
    5. logical
    6. shunpck shuffle&unpacking
  2. pcksp packed single-precision floating-point
  3. simdint 128-bit SIMD integer
    1. datamov data movement
    2. arith packed arithmetic
    3. shunpck shuffle&unpacking
    4. shift
    5. compar comparison
    6. conver conversion
    7. logical
  4. cachect cacheability control
  5. order instruction ordering
SSE3 instruction extensions groups. Note that these groups are just experimental and may change in future.
  1. simdfp SIMD single-precision floating-point (SIMD packed)
    1. datamov data movement
    2. arith packed arithmetic
  2. cachect cacheability control
  3. sync agent synchronization
SSSE3 instruction extensions group. Note that these groups are just experimental and may change in future.
  1. simdint SIMD integer
SSE4.1 instruction extensions group. Note that these groups are just experimental and may change in future.
  1. simdint SIMD integer
    1. datamov data movement
    2. arith packed arithmetic
    3. compar comparison
    4. conver conversion
  2. simdfp SIMD SIMD floating-point
    1. datamov data movement
    2. arith packed arithmetic
    3. conver conversion
  3. cachect cacheability control
SSE4.2 instruction extensions group. Note that these groups are just experimental and may change in future.
  1. simdint SIMD integer
    1. compar comparison
  2. strtxt string and text processing
VMX and SMX instruction extensions has no groups at the moment. The grouping may be added in future.
testedf, modiff, deff, undeff Tested, Modified, Defined, and Undefined Flags
  • For rFlags register, indicates these flags using odiszapc pattern. Present flag fits in with the appropriate group. groupC0
  • For x87FPU flags, indicates these flags using 1234 x87FPU flag pattern. Present flag fits in with the appropriate group. DB/7FSTP
Note that if a flag is present in both Defined and Undefined column, the flag fits in under further conditions, which are not described by this reference.
fvalues Flags Values
  • For rFlags register, indicates the values of flags, which are always set or cleared, using case-sensitive odiszapc flag pattern. Lower-case flag means cleared flag, upper-case means set flag. STC
  • For x87FPU flags, indicates these flags using 1234 x87FPU flag pattern. Present flag holds its value. DBE3FNINIT
description, notes Short desciption of the opcode. For now, the descriptions are very general. They will be improved in future perhaps.

Instruction Operand Codes

These codes come from official codes used in Intel manual Instruction Set Reference,N-Z for Pentium4 processor, revision17. The reason of using this particular, out-of-date revision is that the codes from this revision are most apposite ones. In next revisions the codes changed unfortunately. These codes were modified and completed mainly because of the possibility to code operands simultaneously for 64-bit mode. Ideally, it would be the best to make brand new codes, but I'm afraid those wouldn't be widely acceptable.

The State column says if the code is original, added or changed.

The "Geek" part in these tables in the first column indicates codes used in HTML geek's editions and in the source XML document as well. The "Coder" part indicates alternative codes used in HTML coder's editions. These are used also within instruction reference in Intel manual.

Codes for Addressing Method

The following abbreviations are used for addressing methods:

Geek State Description
Coder
A Original Direct address. The instruction has no ModR/M byte; the address of the operand is encoded in the instruction; no base register, index register, or scaling factor can be applied (for example, far JMP(EA)).
ptr
BA Added Memory addressed by DS:EAX, or by rAX in 64-bit mode (only 0F01C8MONITOR).
m
BB Added Memory addressed by DS:eBX+AL, or by rBX+AL in 64-bit mode (only XLAT). (This code changed from single B in revision 1.00)
m
BD Added Memory addressed by DS:eDI or by RDI (only 0FF7MASKMOVQ and 660FF7MASKMOVDQU) (This code changed from YD (introduced in 1.00) in revision 1.02)
m
C Original The reg field of the ModR/M byte selects a control register (only MOV(0F20,0F22)).
CRn
D Original The reg field of the ModR/M byte selects a debug register (only MOV(0F21,0F23)).
DRn
E Original A ModR/M byte follows the opcode and specifies the operand. The operand is either a general-purpose register or a memory address. If it is a memory address, the address is computed from a segment register and any of the following values: a base register, an index register, a scaling factor, or a displacement.
r/m
ES Added (Implies original E). A ModR/M byte follows the opcode and specifies the operand. The operand is either a x87 FPU stack register or a memory address. If it is a memory address, the address is computed from a segment register and any of the following values: a base register, an index register, a scaling factor, or a displacement.
STi/m
EST Added (Implies original E). A ModR/M byte follows the opcode and specifies the x87 FPU stack register.
STi
F Original rFLAGS register.
-
G Original The reg field of the ModR/M byte selects a general register (for example, AX(000)).
r
H Added The r/m field of the ModR/M byte always selects a general register, regardless of the mod field (for example, MOV(0F20)).
r
I Original Immediate data. The operand value is encoded in subsequent bytes of the instruction.
imm
J Original The instruction contains a relative offset to be added to the instruction pointer register (for example, JMP(E9), LOOP)).
rel
M Original The ModR/M byte may refer only to memory: mod!=11bin (BOUND, LEA, CALLF, JMPF, LES, LDS, LSS, LFS, LGS, CMPXCHG8B, CMPXCHG16B, F20FF0LDDQU).
m
N Original The R/M field of the ModR/M byte selects a packed quadword MMX technology register.
mm
O Original The instruction has no ModR/M byte; the offset of the operand is coded as a word, double word or quad word (depending on address size attribute) in the instruction. No base register, index register, or scaling factor can be applied (only MOV (A0, A1, A2, A3)).
moffs
P Original The reg field of the ModR/M byte selects a packed quadword MMX technology register.
mm
Q Original A ModR/M byte follows the opcode and specifies the operand. The operand is either an MMX technology register or a memory address. If it is a memory address, the address is computed from a segment register and any of the following values: a base register, an index register, a scaling factor, and a displacement.
mm/m64
R Original The mod field of the ModR/M byte may refer only to a general register (only MOV(0F20-0F24, 0F26)).
r
S Original The reg field of the ModR/M byte selects a segment register (only MOV(8C, 8E)).
Sreg
SC Added Stack operand, used by instructions which either push an operand to the stack or pop an operand from the stack. Pop-like instructions are, for example, POP, RET, IRET, LEAVE. Push-like are, for example, PUSH, CALL, INT. No Operand type is provided along with this method because it depends on source/destination operand(s).
-
T Original The reg field of the ModR/M byte selects a test register (only MOV(0F24, 0F26)).
TRn
U Original The R/M field of the ModR/M byte selects a 128-bit XMM register.
xmm
V Original The reg field of the ModR/M byte selects a 128-bit XMM register.
xmm
W Original A ModR/M byte follows the opcode and specifies the operand. The operand is either a 128-bit XMM register or a memory address. If it is a memory address, the address is computed from a segment register and any of the following values: a base register, an index register, a scaling factor, and a displacement
xmm/m
X Original Memory addressed by the DS:eSI or by RSI (only MOVS, CMPS, OUTS, and LODS). In 64-bit mode, only 64-bit (RSI) and 32-bit (ESI) address sizes are supported. In non-64-bit modes, only 32-bit (ESI) and 16-bit (SI) address sizes are supported.
m
Y Original Memory addressed by the ES:eDI or by RDI (only MOVS, CMPS, INS, STOS, and SCAS). In 64-bit mode, only 64-bit (RDI) and 32-bit (EDI) address sizes are supported. In non-64-bit modes, only 32-bit (EDI) and 16-bit (DI) address sizes are supported. The implicit ES segment register cannot be overriden by a segment prefix.
m
Z Added The instruction has no ModR/M byte; the three least-significant bits of the opcode byte selects a general-purpose register
r

The following abbreviations are used for addressing methods only in case of direct segment registers and are accessible only in HTML geek's editions as segment register's title. As for source XML document, they are used within address atribute of syntax/dst or syntax/src elements. All of them are added:

S2 The two bits at bit index three of the opcode byte selects one of original four segment registers (for example, PUSHES).
S30 The three least-significant bits of the opcode byte selects segment register SS, FS, or GS (for example, LSS).
S33 The three bits at bit index three of the opcode byte selects segment register FS or GS (for example, PUSHFS).

Codes for Operand Type

The following abbreviations are used for operand types:

Geek State Description
Coder
a Original Two one-word operands in memory or two double-word operands in memory, depending on operand-size attribute (only BOUND).
16/32&16/32
b Original Byte, regardless of operand-size attribute.
8
bcd Added Packed-BCD. Only x87 FPU instructions (for example, FBLD).
80dec
bs Added; simplified bsq Byte, sign-extended to the size of the destination operand.
8
bsq Original; replaced by bs (Byte, sign-extended to 64 bits.)
-
bss Original Byte, sign-extended to the size of the stack pointer (for example, PUSH(6A)).
8
c Original Byte or word, depending on operand-size attribute. (unused even by Intel?)
?
d Original Doubleword, regardless of operand-size attribute.
32
di Added Doubleword-integer. Only x87 FPU instructions (for example, FIADD).
32int
dq Original Double-quadword, regardless of operand-size attribute (for example, CMPXCHG16B).
128
dqp Added; combines d and qp Doubleword, or quadword, promoted by REX.W in 64-bit mode (for example, MOVSXD).
32/64
dr Added Double-real. Only x87 FPU instructions (for example, FADD).
64real
ds Original Doubleword, sign-extended to 64 bits (for example, CALL(E8).
32
e Added x87 FPU environment (for example, FSTENV).
14/28
er Added Extended-real. Only x87 FPU instructions (for example, FLD).
80real
p Original 32-bit or 48-bit pointer, depending on operand-size attribute (for example, CALLF(9A).
16:16/32
pi Original Quadword MMX technology data.
(64)
pd Original 128-bit packed double-precision floating-point data.
ps Original 128-bit packed single-precision floating-point data.
(128)
psq Added 64-bit packed single-precision floating-point data.
64
pt Original; replaced by ptp (80-bit far pointer.)
-
ptp Added 32-bit or 48-bit pointer, depending on operand-size attribute, or 80-bit far pointer, promoted by REX.W in 64-bit mode (for example, CALLF(FF/3)).
16:16/32/64
q Original Quadword, regardless of operand-size attribute (for example, CALL(FF/2)).
64
qi Added Qword-integer. Only x87 FPU instructions (for example, FILD).
64int
qp Original Quadword, promoted by REX.W (for example, IRETQ).
64
s Changed to 6-byte pseudo-descriptor, or 10-byte pseudo-descriptor in 64-bit mode (for example, SGDT).
- Changed from 6-byte pseudo-descriptor.
sd Original Scalar element of a 128-bit packed double-precision floating data.
-
si Original Doubleword integer register (e.g., eax). (unused even by Intel?)
?
sr Added Single-real. Only x87 FPU instructions (for example, FADD).
32real
ss Original Scalar element of a 128-bit packed single-precision floating data.
-
st Added x87 FPU state (for example, FSAVE).
94/108
stx Added x87 FPU and SIMD state (FXSAVE and FXRSTOR).
512
t Original; replaced by ptp 10-byte far pointer.
-
v Original Word or doubleword, depending on operand-size attribute (for example, INC(40), PUSH(50)).
16/32
vds Added; combines v and ds Word or doubleword, depending on operand-size attribute, or doubleword, sign-extended to 64 bits for 64-bit operand size.
16/32
vq Original Quadword (default) or word if operand-size prefix is used (for example, PUSH(50)).
64/16
vqp Added; combines v and qp Word or doubleword, depending on operand-size attribute, or quadword, promoted by REX.W in 64-bit mode.
16/32/64
vs Original Word or doubleword sign extended to the size of the stack pointer (for example, PUSH(68)).
16/32
w Original Word, regardless of operand-size attribute (for example, ENTER).
16
wi Added Word-integer. Only x87 FPU instructions (for example, FIADD).
16int

The following abbreviations are used for operand types and are accessible only in HTML geek's editions as operand's code title. They are issued to indicate a dependency on address-size attribute instead of operand-size attribute. As for source XML document, they are used within address atribute of syntax/dst or syntax/src elements. All of them are added:

va Word or doubleword, according to address-size attribute (only REP and LOOP families).
dqa Doubleword or quadword, according to address-size attribute (only REP and LOOP families).
wa Word, according to address-size attribute (only JCXZ instruction).
wo Word, according to current operand size (e.g., MOVSW instruction).
ws Word, according to current stack size (only PUSHF and POPF instructions in 64-bit mode).
da Doubleword, according to address-size attribute (only JECXZ instruction).
do Doubleword, according to current operand size (e.g., MOVSD instruction).
qa Quadword, according to address-size attribute (only JRCXZ instruction).
qs Quadword, according to current stack size (only PUSHFQ and POPFQ instructions).

Source XML Document

Description of the source XML structure is available only as a part of the benefits. Brief notes are also inside the DTD file.

Current State

In this version, the reference is almost complete. It contains general, system, x87FPU, MMX, SSE, SSE1, SSE2, SSE3, SSSE3, SSE4, VMX, and SMX instructions (both one-byte and two-byte ones). We are working on AMD-specific instructions and Intel AVX instructions now.

The MMX and SSE* instruction classification among groups is considered experimental and may change in future.

Future plans

For future, many new specific editions are planned, for example editions containg only instructions from particular group or extension, etc.

Why to Contribute - Benefits

Contributors can get access to benefits, which are not available for passive users. Benefits include HTML editions, which supports printing, PDF editions, many XSL transformations, working drafts, articles, and other related files.

Why are not all these features free?

A few contributors worked hard to help me complete this reference so I gave them advantage this way. I believe that this benefits program can encourage you to find your way how to become an active contributor.

How to Contribute

The following list shows possible contributions:

Note that from the point of project's progress, modifications of any of HTML editions is almost useless. A HTML edition is just a result of transformation of source XML file, so all modifications need to be done there.

Implementations

Bukowski's disassembler is first public implementation of the XMLreference. See also project's blog.

License

The license is here not to restrict regular use of the reference. All I want is to keep control over its development.

  1. If you improve this reference, whether its source files (XML, DTD, XSL transformations) or any of derived files (in any format), send these files to the author. The author reserve the right to use these files for any purpose.
  2. You can publish source or any derivative files in any form only with author's permission and under the following conditions:
    1. Mention the name of the author
    2. Mention this hypertext reference to the source: ref.x86asm.net
    3. Mention this license agreement
  3. You can't sell printed copies of any files (original or derived) of this reference, including cases when it is a part of other project.

Resources

This reference has been completed using the following resources:

Intel manuals

Sandpile.org

AMD manuals

Intel iAPX 86/88, 186/188 User's manual

Credits

Thanks to all these geeks involved in some way in this project:

Christian Ludloff: maintainer of great Sandpile.org site, one of important sources for this project

Martin Mocko a.k.a. vid: many design ideas for HTML editions

Anthony Lopes: great XML and XSL contributions

Aquila: many great contributions

EliCZ: bug reports, design ideas

Cephexin: many great contributions to XML

Miloslav Ponkrc: helped with PHP and JavaScript on this site

William Whistler: valuable reviews and bug reports

Mikae: reviews, bug reports

References

Handily-organized x86 instruction and opcode references

x86オペコードリファレンスその後の後

Referencia de Instrucciones y Cdigos de Operacin (OPCodes) x86

Download

Here go all main files of the reference together. A lot of other files are available only as a part of the benefits.

x86reference.xml 491kB

x86reference.dtd

HTML Editions Files

coder.html coder-abc.html
coder32.html coder32-abc.html
coder64.html coder64-abc.html
geek.html geek-abc.html
geek32.html geek32-abc.html
geek64.html geek64-abc.html

Comments

Continue to discussion board.

My contact information is here.


Revisions

2009-01-20 1.11
  • Mostly a bugfix release
Bugfixes:
  • Many missing SSE2 instructions (actually MMX instructions promoted to XMM registers) added (reported by Phil Keenan):
    • 660F60 /r PUNPCKLBW Vdq, Wdq
    • 660F61 /r PUNPCKLWD Vdq, Wdq
    • 660F62 /r PUNPCKLDQ Vdq, Wdq
    • 660F63 /r PACKSSWB Vdq, Wdq
    • 660F64 /r PCMPGTB Vdq, Wdq
    • 660F65 /r PCMPGTW Vdq, Wdq
    • 660F66 /r PCMPGTD Vdq, Wdq
    • 660F67 /r PACKUSWB Vdq, Wdq
    • 660F68 /r PUNPCKHBW Vdq, Wdq
    • 660F69 /r PUNPCKHWD Vdq, Wdq
    • 660F6A /r PUNPCKHDQ Vdq, Wdq
    • 660F6B /r PACKSSDW Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FD1 /r PSRLW Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FD2 /r PSRLD Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FD3 /r PSRLQ Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FD5 /r PMULLW Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FD8 /r PSUBUSB Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FD9 /r PSUBUSW Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FDB /r PAND Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FDC /r PADDUSB Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FDD /r PADDUSW Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FDF /r PANDN Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FE1 /r PSRAW Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FE2 /r PSRAD Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FE5 /r PMULHW Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FE8 /r PSUBSB Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FE9 /r PSUBSW Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FEB /r POR Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FEC /r PADDSB Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FED /r PADDSW Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FEF /r PXOR Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FF1 /r PSLLW Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FF2 /r PSLLD Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FF3 /r PSLLQ Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FF5 /r PMADDWD Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FF8 /r PSUBB Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FF9 /r PSUBW Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FFA /r PSUBD Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FFC /r PADDB Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FFD /r PADDW Vdq, Wdq
    • 660FFE /r PADDD Vdq, Wdq
  • For the following instructions, P method was fixed to N method (reported by Will Whistler):
    • 0F71 /2 PSRLW Nq, Ib
    • 0F71 /4 PSRAW Nq, Ib
    • 0F71 /6 PSLLW Nq, Ib
    • 0F72 /2 PSRLD Nq, Ib
    • 0F72 /4 PSRAD Nq, Ib
    • 0F72 /6 PSLLD Nq, Ib
    • 0F73 /2 PSRLQ Nq, Ib
    • 0F73 /6 PSLLQ Nq, Ib
  • Many other small bugfixes, including the DTD
Other:
  • Hintable NOP instructions added (suggested by Mikae)
  • New SSE2 subgroups: simdint/conver and simdint/logical
MazeGen
2009-08-19 1.10 News:
  • All SSE4 instructions (Aquila contribution)
  • All VMX instructions
  • (the only) SMX instruction
  • All new general instructions: POPCNT, MOVBE
  • All new system instructions: XGETBV, XSETBV, RDTSCP, XSAVE, XRSTOR
  • Processor code C7 to indicate Corei7
  • Implicate register operand group xcr (extended control register) added because of XGETBV and XSETBV instructions
HTML editions:
  • Many new general notes
  • ModR/M byte and SIB byte encoding tables
Bugfixes:
  • MOVD and MOVQ instructions added:
    • 0F6E MOVQ Pq, Eqp (in 64-bit mode with REX.W)
    • 0F7E MOVQ Eqp, Pq (in 64-bit mode with REX.W)
    • 660F6E MOVD Vdq, Ed
    • 660F6E MOVQ Vdq, Eqp (in 64-bit mode with REX.W)
    • 660F7E MOVD Ed, Vdq
    • 660F7E MOVQ Eqp, Vdq (in 64-bit mode with REX.W)
    • F30F7E MOVQ Vq, Wq
    • 660FD6 MOVQ Wq, Vq
  • Many other small bugfixes
MazeGen
2009-06-30 1.02
  • This is the first revision considered stable (after more than two years of development)
Bugfixes:
  • LODSB (AC): addressing method corrected to X
  • All LODS variants: depend='no' attribute removed from src element
  • SCASD (AF), 64-bit entry: EAX type corrected to d
  • UD (0FB9): entry attribute r='yes' added
  • Duplicated syntaxes for PUSHA, POPA, PUSHF and POPF in 386+ entries removed
  • Duplicated two-byte/pri_opcd element with value 18 merged into one
  • HSUBPS (F20F7D): fixed prefix corrected to F2
  • FSTP1 (D9/3), FCOM2 (DC/2), FCOMP3 (DC/3), FXCH4 (DD/1), FCOMP5 (DE/2), FXCH7 (DF/1), FSTP8 (DF/2), FSTP9 (DF/3): proc_end='02' element added
  • First entry for opcode F390: proc_end='09' element added
  • CMPXCHG8B and CMPXCHG16B (0FC7/1) merged into one 64-bit entry
  • Entries for CALL (E8), JMP (E9), and Jcc (0F80-0F8F) merged while merging operand types v and ds to (documented) vds
  • All JMPE instruction entries and RSM entry: grp1='system', grp2='branch' elements added
  • CLTS entry: grp1='system' element added
  • EMMS entry: grp1='x87fpu', grp2='control' elements added
  • Missing depend='no' attribute added to many dst elements at various places
  • UD and UD2 entries: attribute attr='invd' added
  • IMUL (69, 6B) entries: r='yes' attribute added
  • ENTER and LEAVE: 64-bit entry added while correcting eBP type to v and rBP type to vq
  • LOOPE (E1), non-64-bit entry: type of eCX corrected to va
  • MOVDRn,r (0F23), undocumented entry: addressing method corrected to H
  • Branch hint prefixes (2E, 3E, 64) entries: proc_start@post='no' attribute added, proc_end='10' element added
  • All entries with attr='undef' and prefix-branch-cond grouping for opcodes 2E, 3E, and 64 removed
  • SYSENTER and SYSEXIT entries: grp2='stack' removed, SS and ESP or RSP register operands added
  • SYSENTER: 64-bit entry added because RSP is fixed to 64 bits in 64-bit mode
  • Either src or dst element with new implicate addressing method SC added to entries with grp2='stack' element value
  • MOV from segment register (8C): memory operand size and register operand size differ (reported by Mikae)
  • MOV to segment register (8E): source operand is always a word (reported by Mikae)
  • The following SSE2 instructions added (reported by Mikae):
    • 660F71/2PSRLWUdq,Ib
    • 660F71/4PSRAWUdq,Ib
    • 660F71/6PSLLWUdq,Ib
    • 660F72/2PSRLDUdq,Ib
    • 660F72/4PSRADUdq,Ib
    • 660F72/6PSLLDUdq,Ib
    • 660F73/2PSRLQUdq,Ib
    • 660F73/6PSLLQUdq,Ib
    • 660F74/rPCMPEQBVdq,Wdq
    • 660F75/rPCMPEQWVdq,Wdq
    • 660F76/rPCMPEQDVdq,Wdq
  • MOV from/to DRn register (0F21, 0F23): size of the other operand differs between 64-bit mode and non-64-bit modes, regardless of REX.W prefix (reported by Mikae)
  • LAR (0F02) and LSL (0F03): attribute entry/@r="yes" added (reported by Mikae)
Backward-incompatible changes to the XML and DTD:
  • All default attribute values removed from DTD
  • Addressing methods BA, BB, F, X, Y, and YD are always implicate so they are not indicated using a and t elements
  • Addressing method YD renamed to BD
  • New implicate type wo issued for PUSHA, POPA, INS, INSW, OUTS, OUTSW, CBW, CWD, PUSHF, POPF, MOVS, MOVSW, CMPS, CMPSW, STOS, STOSW, LODS, LODSW, SCAS, SCASW, and IRET to indicate fixed operand size according to current operand size
  • New implicate type do issued for PUSHAD, POPAD, INSD, OUTSD, CWDE, CDQ, PUSHFD, POPFD, MOVSD, CMPSD, STOSD, LODSD, SCASD, IRETD to indicate fixed operand size according to current operand size
  • New implicate type ws issued for PUSHF and POPF in 64-bit mode to indicate fixed operand size according to current stack size
  • New implicate type qs issued for PUSHFQ and POPFQ to indicate fixed operand size according to current stack size
News to the XML and DTD:
  • Attribute is_doc (only value yes) for entry element, used along with doc='u' attribute value
  • Attribute is_undoc (only value yes) for entry element
  • Implicate addressing method SC
  • Node note has two new nodes: brief, which contains original note contents, and det, not used yet
Other changes:
  • CBW (98): destination operand changed to AX
  • The stack subgroup of system main group is no longer used
MazeGen
2008-12-17 1.01β
  • I forgot to upload the XML reference for previous revision. Now it comes in this revision
Bugfixes:
  • CALLF (FF/3) and JMPF (FF/5): only a memory operand is allowed (reported by Fabio Fernandes)
  • PSRLD (0F72/2): typo in mnemonic (reported by Japheth)
  • PMADDUBSW ([66]0F3804) description fixed
The following bugfixes affect the geek suite:
  • Opcodes FF/2, FF/3, FF/4, FF/5, FF/6 had unfounded W opcode field (reported by William Whistler)
The following changes and bugfixes affects mostly only the XML reference and DTD:
  • Backward-incompatible change: Operand type vaqp removed, was wrong
  • Backward-incompatible change: New operand type dqa issued to replace removed vaqp for REP family operands and LOOP family operands in 64-bit mode
  • Backward-incompatible change: Decided not to indicate sign extension on MOVSXD operand
  • New attribute escape for sec_opcd element to indicate three-byte escapes 0F38XX and 0F3AXX
  • Removed all entities from DTD to make it ready to convert to XSD (suggested by Herbert Oppmann)
  • Bugfix: all @op_size attributes removed from opcodes FF/2, FF/3, FF/4, FF/5, FF/6 (reported by William Whistler)
  • Bugfix: No (implicate) rFlags operand was declared correctly (reported by William Whistler)
  • New implicate Addressing method F for rFlags operand defined in DTD
  • Bugfix: Many entry/@mod and syntax@mod attributes changed and fixed
MazeGen
2008-10-19 1.00β News:
  • All SSE, SSE2, SSE3, and SSSE3 instructions added (Aquila and Cephexin contributions)
  • Alphabetically sorted editions (postfixed with -abc)
  • On-line store improved, prices discounted
  • The HTML transformation process is not documented now
Bugfixes:
  • FDIVRPST1,ST secondary opcode was missing, it should be F1
  • PAUSE instruction came with SSE2
  • PUSHFF/6, FCOMI, FCOMIP, FISTTP, FNSAVE, FSAVE and TAKEN prefix description fixed
The following changes and bugfixes affect mostly only the XML reference:
  • CALLFF/2, CALLFFF/3, JMPFF/4, JMPFFF/5, PUSHFF/6: the operand must be src instead of dst
  • Opcode D9/3, doc_part_alias_ref attribute fixed
  • All MMX instructions' operand codes fixed using a and t elements
  • Backward-incompatible change of B addressing code to BB
  • The gen_notes and ring_notes nodes are no longer present in the XML
  • All id attributes renamed to xml:id
  • New sup and sub child elements for notes node
  • New addressing code BA
  • New particular attribute for entry node
MazeGen
2008-05-15 0.40β News:
  • All MMX instructions added (Anthony Lopes contribution)
  • HTML transformation process has changed
  • Support for printing from the public files is no longer available (i.e., PDF editions are no longer publicly available as well)
Bugfixes:
  • CLTS (0F06): valid only at ring 0; valid also in real mode (reported by Anthony Lopes, EliCZ)
  • STD (FD): typo in mnemonic (reported by EliCZ, andrewl)
  • WRMSR (0F30): confusing and unnecessary 64-bit operands (reported by EliCZ)
  • RDTSC (0F31), RDPMC (0F33): unnecessary 64-bit entry (reported by EliCZ)
  • LAR (0F02), LSL (0F03): valid only in protected mode (reported by EliCZ)
  • HLT (F4), SYSRET (0F07), SWAPGS (0F01 /7): valid only at ring0 (reported by EliCZ)
The following changes and bugfixes affect mostly only the XML reference:
  • MOV (A2, A3): dst must be depend='no', src must not
  • CMPS (A6, A7): first src must not be depend='no'
  • SCAS (AE): no dst operand, both operands are src
  • SCAS (AF): first src operand must not be depend='no'
  • Attribute proc_start/@post="no" duplicated using proc_end element
  • Operand address and type codes split into a and t subelements (DTD changed along)
MazeGen
2008-03-11 0.30β
  • All x87 FPU instructions added, including new ones
  • The l column was renamed to x and now holds more information
  • In HTML a PDF editions, the prefix values were moved to pf column
  • On-line store opened
  • The project was renamed to X86 Opcode and Instruction Reference
MazeGen
2007-11-29 0.21β
  • The HTML table is split into two parts: one-byte and two-byte opcode part. This should make browsers to render it faster and more easily. I hope this also helps Firefox to render the table at first (without refresh)
  • Instructions, which doesn't really test all flags but push them on the stack (PUSHF, INT and few others) are corrected (suggested by Wolfgang Kern)
  • PDF edition for each HTML edition
MazeGen
2007-11-06 0.20β Added coder, coder32, coder64, geek32, and geek64 editions. All main project's files modified. Project's documentation completed. MazeGen
2007-06-04 0.10β First public version MazeGen

(dates format correspond to ISO 8601)